Build an Awesome Vendor Scorecard Program in 4 Easy Steps

Vendor scorecards measure and track supplier performance on various dimensions that are important to your organization. At first, I was reluctant to start a scorecard program because I thought our company was too small and too busy. However, after eventually beginning our program, I saw powerful results that freed up time and helped the company grow.

Vendor Scorecard Example

Vendor Scorecard Template with ExamplesVendor scorecards strengthen supply chain relationships and help focus your suppliers on what matters most to you. Scorecards set goals for your vendors to reach for so they can become your vendor of choice. You can clearly see where each vendor ranks against each other, which helps you decide which supplier to work with on complex projects. This article outlines the four steps I took in building our company’s vendor scorecard program. I have attached a Excel Vendor Scorecard Template that I put together as a starting place for your own scorecard.

1. Decide What Matters

The first step in creating a vendor scorecard program is to define what your ideal vendor would look like. For me, it would be someone that communicated clearly 100% of the time, shipped quality products for free, and had a lead time of 15 minutes. Although those requests are a bit ridiculous in my industry, it does highlight what matters to me in my vendors: communication, quality, pricing, and lead-time. Together with my team, we took my brainstorm farther and came up with four categories that matter most to us with our vendors:

  • Pricing/costs, including payment terms
  • Production and Supply chain, including communication and lead-time
  • Quality
  • Product Development

Essentially, if our vendors could continually improve on these four points each year, our organization would benefit immensely.

2. Measure the Metrics

Having defined the broad categories, we now have to build the nitty-gritty of the scorecard. You need to build specific, measurable metrics for each category. Specifically, what exactly will you measure, and more importantly, how? For example, a pricing metric could be a comparison of costs between all capable vendors. A quality metric might be the percentage of orders with quality defects.

Good scorecard metrics should clearly define what is good, acceptable, and bad performance in each dimension. Your metrics should be a score for how your vendors are doing in aspects that matter most to you. They should be easy to understand, and if possible, easy to calculate. Unfortunately, building the perfect metrics often takes some deep thought to get them right.

Nailing the Details is Key

Many metrics were much more complicated to fully define than I thought they would be. For example, lead time is an excellent metric that I use. Tracking the time from when you place an order to when it gets delivered is a great way to compare vendors and encourage reductions in lead time. However, measuring this can be tricky when you get into the details. Should you track the time until delivery at to your location or delivery at port? If you ask a vendor to delay a shipment, will their lead-time artificially inflate?

For most quantitative metrics, your accounting system should have the records you need. However, based on the specific things you want to measure  you also might need to start tracking new events or information. For both of the above lead-time questions, I had to change our receipt processes to account for how we wanted to measure that metric. Despite the added work, tracking more data allowed us to trust our metrics and better compare our vendors apples to apples.

A Note on Subjective Scores

When hard data is unavailable or impossible, use a subjective grade. For example, “This Vendor is Flexible in Requests to Alter Production” is a difficult metric to track in our ERP system. Instead, at the end of each quarter, our supply chain team fills out a survey for each vendor that rates them on several dimensions such as flexibility. Rating vendors on a scale is the best way to get a good score from a soft metric. Even better is when the survey has an example for a top, middle, and bottom score for the metric so that scoring is more consistent across teammates. Recording everything in a free Google Form that you send out to your team is even better.

Google Doc Questionnaire 2

Weight What Matters

Once you have the metrics you want to measure (I have 4-6 in each category), it’s time to weight them. Start by rating the overall categories. The pricing category may be 25% of the total score, quality 40%. When your categories equal 100%, weight the individual components of each category. For example, if the quality category is weighted at 20% and has three metrics, then those three metrics could be 5%, 12%, and 3%, which adds up to 20%. The Vendor Scorecard Template shows my weighting.

Example Weighting

Pull Out the Gradebook

Maybe it’s from the report cards I received every semester in public school, but the A through F scale carries a lot of significance to me. That’s why I like to use that scale for each of my metrics. Some can only receive an A or F, or A, C, or F, but they all have the same percentage score. Based on their grade, vendors receive a percentage of that metrics weight as follows:

  • A – 100% A metric with 10% of the total scorecard weight would be 10% with an A
  • B – 75% (7.5% with the same metric)
  • C – 50% (5%)
  • D – 25% (2.5%)
  • F – 0%

Color-coding the scale adds the final touch of understanding so that it translates well and conveys the message clearly.

Example Weighting

Build the Document

Finally, once you’ve figured out your categories, metrics, and weighting, put it all together in a spreadsheet scorecard. You can use my template as a starting point to build your own.

3. Roll Out the Program

Once your scorecard is complete, implementation is your next bull to lasso. You’ll need to devise a plan to clearly communicate what, why, and how you are measuring your vendors. Depending on your suppliers, your experience could be much different, but here’s what I did.Why a Vendor Scroecard?

First, I put together a presentation with one or more slides explaining the following. It was detailed and thorough so that our vendors could clearly understand each score. Specifically, the document had the following:

  • A detailed explanation of each category and metric
    • For complex calculations, I included an example slide
    • Explanation of weights were also included
  • Reasons why we were beginning the vendor scorecard program
  • The implementation schedule (trial and full launch)
  • Our commitment to our vendors

Armed with a document that clearly defined the program, our CEO emailed the presentation and the scorecard spreadsheet to the leadership of our key suppliers. He asked them to review it and then meet with us in a video conference discussing the program. During the meetings with our six key suppliers, the CEO expressed support of the program and our supply chain team explained the details. Most vendors appreciate being measured on more than just price, and so all of our vendors were excited about the program as a chance to prove their holistic value to our company.

We designated the first month as a trial period where we would track performance, iron out issues, and report scores but not take action based on their results. After meeting at the end of the first month to discuss the trial run, we began the program in earnest.

4. Review and Reward

What will make your vendor scorecard program truly succeed is your diligence after implementation. I strive to send out scorecards on-time at the end of every quarter. My team schedules meetings via Skype or in person to review the scorecard each quarter and discuss ways to improve. The communication is two-way – we want all our vendors to reach perfect scores. That is why we council openly about what each of us can change to improve the metrics.

Another big decision to make is what you’ll do because of the scores. Will vendors with consistently high scores obtain a preferred status? Will quality checks or audits happen less frequently? Will you distance yourself from vendors who are very cheap, but fail in every other category? Will you reward contracts based on scores?

If you find yourself rewarding higher scores with more business, then your weighting is probably correct. However, if more and more business is still going to vendors with lower scores, then consider revising your scorecard to better reflect your company’s true priorities.

A great and relatively inexpensive way to encourage scorecard improvement is a vendor of the year program. This could involve a personal meeting, dinner with the CEO, and a plaque for the winning company. When I watch the “Walmart Vendor of the Year” award go to one of my competitors, I find new motivation to improve. Your suppliers may feel the same.

Bonus Step – Survey Your Vendors for Improvement Tips

If your vendor scorecard program is chugging along, then consider asking your vendors to score you. Sending a quarterly feedback survey to your vendors to discuss at the same time as their scorecard can bring insights into how you can be a better customer. Some questions could be:

  • What good practices do your other customers do that you wish we did?
  • What can we do to help you reduce lead-time?
  • What was an example of a project that went well? What about that experience can we recreate for all future projects?

If you make it clear they won’t be penalized for honesty, then you may be lucky enough to get great feedback on how to truly improve. Becoming a better customer can help your vendors better service you. In addition, you may pick up some best practices from their other customers or resolve root causes of your own deep problems. Address these issues in the scorecard review meetings and make commitments to improve when possible. We received a lot best practice tips from our vendors when we said, “we’re really bad at forecasting, so we’ve brought on staff with forecasting experience and invested in the software we needed.” They detailed how their other customers forecast and recommended we try the same.

Final Thoughts

As I talked about in my article on supply chain gamification, games have a way of bringing out our passion and motivation. A vendor scorecard brings the power of game mentality to supplier relations. “Just keep everything green and keep out reds” becomes the goal of your vendors. “Work with the highest scoring vendors” becomes your vendor selection shortcut. Measuring progress brings improvement that both your vendor and you will enjoy.

From the success I’ve seen from the program, I wish I had started it years ago. This quickly brought to mind the mantra of a friend of mine in process improvement. “There’s two good times to plant a tree: twenty years ago and now.”

If you haven’t started a program yet, begin today. If you have one already, take a look at how you can improve. Either way, share your experience in a comment below.

Update – Learn More about Vendor Scorecards in our Podcast

In our podcast interview with Mark Kosiba (former VP of Operations at Skullcandy), Mark talks about vendor scorecards and their effect on his company. The above model was based on his help, so it definitely applies to anyone wanting to implement a vendor scorecard program similar to the above.

Check out the podcast to learn more: How Skullcandy Rocked S&OP (and Vendor Scorecards)

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    3 thoughts on “Build an Awesome Vendor Scorecard Program in 4 Easy Steps

    1. Pingback: Weekly Roundup: Improving Vendor Relationships | The Accounting MinuteThe Accounting Minute

    2. Garth

      So, can you elaborate on your Product Pricing explanation…your average is the average of all prices for a given item?

      Reply
      1. Alex Fuller Post author

        Garth – I rank vendor pricing against other vendors based on the total quantity of items purchased during the quarter compared with price quotes from all competent vendors. Please see the below image for an example of how I calculate pricing:

        Pricing Example

        It’s a little complicated, but it seems the most fair to me.

        Reply

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