Tag Archives: Gamification

The Most Popular Supply Chain Cowboy Articles of 2014

We’ve seen significant growth this year – online traffic and subscribers have more than tripled from 2013. It’s great to know there’s so many people working together to tame the wild west of supply chain management.

Below is a list of our five most popular articles from the past year:

Number 5 – How Skullcandy Rocked S&OP

How Skullcandy Rocked S&OPFor Supply Chain Cowboy’s first podcast, I had a great interview with Mark Kosiba, former VP of Operations at Skullcandy. He shared a ton of great advice on how small companies can leverage their nimbleness to grow and become world-class operations in competitive fields. If you haven’t yet listened to what Mark had to share, be sure to download it now so you can listen to it during your next commute.

Check it out here: How Skullcandy Rocked S&OP

Number 4 – Startups, Sourcing, and Sustainability with Mark Dwight of Rickshaw Bagworks – Interview Part 1 of 2

Mark DwightWant an example of what supply chain excellence and lean production really look like at a San Francisco bag company? Then be sure to check out this Q&A interview with the CEO of Ricksaw Bagworks. The article received a lot of positive social media attention, especially from people passionate about US-based manufacturing and small business entrepreneurs.

Check it out here: Startups, Sourcing, and Sustainability with Mark Dwight of Rickshaw Bagworks – Interview Part 1 of 2

Number 3 – One Easy Excel Formula to Track Shipments

Ship Track Excel FromulaIf anyone in your organization tracks packages, then they’ll definitely want to take a look at this article. It reviews a free excel add-in that lets you track shipments from most major carriers with a single formula. Even if you’ve shied away from tracking your shipments in the past because of how much work it can be, the article shows how that might now be possible.

Check it out here: One Easy Excel Formula to Track Shipments

Number 2 – Tips for the APICS CSCP Exam

Tips for the APICS CSCP ExamSupply Chain Certifications are growing in popularity to not only help build an educational base, but distinguish job seekers looking to advance their career. This article details what I learned while preparing for the APICS CSCP exam, including useful advice for how to tackle the test. The first section about whether the exam is even worth pursuing is a great read for supply chain managers wanting to develop their team’s skills.

Check it out here: Tips for the APICS CSCP Exam

Number 1, the Most Popular Article in 2014 – Build an Awesome Vendor Scorecard Program in 4 Easy Steps

Vendor Scorecard ExampleThis vendor scorecard how-to article won by a wide margin, attracting one in every four visitors during 2014. As supplier relationships become more important to a firm’s success, scorecards provide a simple and effective method of managing those connections. The downloadable template, included in the article, is a great place to start in building your vendor metric program. If you’re looking for the best bang for your buck in improving your supply chain, be sure to check this article out now.

Check it out here: Build an Awesome Vendor Scorecard Program in 4 Easy Steps

What’s Coming in 2015?

Here’s a sneak peak to a few articles and podcasts coming in the next couple months.

  • The First Steps in Improving Small Business Operations
  • Fighting Fires – a How-To Guide
  • More Business and Lean Quotes
  • Bringing Lean into Your Organization

What else would you like to see as topics for articles? I’ve had some great conversations with readers this past year, and I’d love to hear from you too. What topics are you interested in – and what challenges are you up against? Shoot me an email, or post in a comment below.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great holiday season and a happy new year! Grab your cowboy hat and join me in riding your forklift into the sunset of 2014.

Interview for Bank of America Article

A couple weeks ago, I did an interview with Robert Lerose, who writes for the Bank of America blog. His article was posted this week, and it has some great advice for small business supply chains.

Check it out here:

Optimizing The Pipeline: Managing your supply chain more efficiently

Bank of America Logo

Tips for the APICS CSCP Exam

Tips for the APICS CSCP ExamA while back, I took and passed the APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) exam. Since then, I’ve had a quite a few people ask me what it’s like and what advice I have. I’ve consolidated and summarized my experience in the article below.

Is the APICS CSCP Exam Right for Me?

Which Certification Should I Pursue?

The first thing you need to do is determine whether the CSCP exam is the right certification for you. Certification is definitely a plus in the supply chain profession. There are quite a few different options, most of which are summarized in this excellent chart on Wikipedia. To begin my journey, I spent a lot of time looking at these different options.

For me, it really came down to which organization I wanted my certification from. In my opinion, the two strongest options are APICS and the Institute for Supply Management (ISM).

APICS offers two certifications. The CSCP is an overall look at supply chain management. The CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management) is more focused on inventory and production at a detailed level. ISM offers one main certification, the Certified Purchasing Manager (CPM). The CPM is primarily geared toward procurement.

Certification Job Search

Next, I began searching Monster.com and other job sites to see what types of opportunities these certifications might unlock. I was quickly surprised how many jobs said “APICS certification preferred” or “CSCP preferred” – especially jobs that appealed to me. From this, I decided to go for the CSCP. If I were more interested in just buying, then ISM’s Certified Purchasing Manager (CPM) would make sense.

APICS vs. ISM

Is Certification Worth It?

The cost of the study materials and test made me pause for a moment. Some employers are happy to help out with the $1,000 to $2,000 total cost. Mine wasn’t, but the investment made sense. I was also looking at business school programs at this time, and I was surprised to learn how strongly some MBA programs promote this same certification, sometimes even for their current students. While I didn’t want to take on extra studying as a MBA student, the fact that the schools were recommending these certifications sealed the deal for me.

What Materials Should I Use to Study?

Only two roads made sense to me if you’re serious about earning your CSCP: self-study or a class.

About the APICS CSCP Learning System (and How to Get It for Less)

The APICS CSCP Learning System is definitely the way to go for self-study. While they can’t claim that the system teaches everything that’s on the test – it gets pretty darn close. Unfortunately, it has a steep price tag of $1275. To reduce that, purchase an APICS membership. Student memberships are free, and professional memberships are $200 per year. Being a member gives you an instant $330 discount on the Learning System. If you have friends who also want to study, you can get a discount when you purchase more than one set at the same time. For instance, I saved $100 by purchasing my study materials at the same time as a friend. Search online forums and try to find someone to go in together with – it could save you a few hundred dollars.

Buy A Used APICS CSCP Learning System

BuyUsedCSCP 2Another option is to buy a used CSCP Learning System. A friend of mine has a network of people looking to sell their used CSCP Learning System sets for half the cost of a new set. You can contact her for more information through the inquiry form on this page: Used APICS CSCP Learning Systems For Sale.

Local or Online Class

The other option is to prepare for the test through a class that essentially walks you through the APICS Learning System as a group. Local APICS chapters will sporadically offer certification classes for a variety of prices. If you can, find one that doesn’t charge more than the books. Classes are very helpful for people that need an outside motivator that will help them study the materials. If you know you won’t be able to read 1,000 pages of text without having to attend a weekly class – then this is the route you should go. In addition, you’ll meet others studying the same material – so if you’re a social learner, this may be the key to your success.

Getting Through the Material

The textbooks are incredibly dry (at least the 2013 versions were). They just spit out facts with no stories and hardly any diagrams. At first, this was very frustrating and horribly boring. However, after a few hundred pages, I began to appreciate this style. The books cover a vast amount of materials in close to 1,000 pages. If they had more fluff, then that number would obvious increase dramatically.

Applying the concepts to my current job also helped. Whether it’s writing in the margins or discussing the concepts with your team, applying what you learn is the best way to really remember it. I help make quite a few changes in our department while studying the CSCP concepts.

For the most part, I had to sit down and force myself to read an entire textbook section in one sitting. Otherwise, I found it very difficult to find the motivation to come back to the section. Luckily, the textbook is broken up into fairly short sections. Each section has an online review quiz. This is where the Learning System really shines.

The online portion of the APICS Learning System is what saved me. The quizzes help me remember the key points from the chapter. I was often frustrated by the quiz questions – some are very poorly written and the correct answers are often debatable. They hopefully fixed those questions, but be warned that some may still be ambiguous. I was very worried that the test questions would be just as ambiguous. Don’t worry though – I thought all the test questions were very straightforward.

The online tools are accessible by smartphone, tablet, or desktop. However, I found that my smartphone was the least frustrating method of taking the tests. The tests seem to be much slower and harder to navigate on my desktop. So even when my laptop was available, I usually used my phone instead.

As great as the online quizzes are, the absolute best help are the flashcards. So much of the test depends on whether you know the vocabulary. I printed out flashcards and used them regularly. A friend of mine stumbled on another method if you find paper flashcards less motivating:

A Free Online APICS Flashcard Game

Screenshot of APICS Flashcards Game

While it’s not quite as awesome as Call of Duty or Little Big Planet, it’s a more fun way to learn the vocabulary quickly.

How Long Does Studying for the APICS CSCP Exam Take?

It took me three months to complete the APICS Learning System. Now to be fair, my first child was born during this time, so that slowed me down a bit. However, if you read for an average of an hour each day, you can finish in three months or less.

Looking back, I probably studied a bit too much. If you can pass all the online quizzes with 80% or more, then I would feel pretty confident that you’ll pass the exam. I actually thought the real test was a bit easier than the review quizzes in the CSCP Learning System.

I’ve heard rumors that most of the people that fail the exam do not speak English as their primary language. So if you are not a native English speaker, you may want to study a bit more and understand all the words in all the online quizzes.

What was Your Method of Studying for the APICS CSCP Exam?

This was my detailed routine of study for the exam:

  • Take the pretest to see what the questions would be like
  • Read one section (1A or 1B for example)
  • Take the quiz for that section (Quiz 1A)
  • If I didn’t get over 80% on the quiz, then I retook the quiz and read up on the questions I missed
  • Once I got over 80% and understood the questions I had missed, I’d move onto the next section
  • After I finished all the sections in the three modules, I’d take the test for the entire module. I’d review the questions I missed until I felt comfortable moving on.
  • Once a week, I’d run through all the flashcards – even if I hadn’t reached those words in the book yet. After a few weeks, I knew all the words very well.
  • After finishing all three modules, I took the post-test
  • Right before the test, I took a day off work and reviewed all of the books again. This was probably overkill, but I really didn’t want to shell out the extra money to retake the test.

I had a friend studying at the same time, so we would compare notes every few days. Mostly, having someone else kept me on track – and complaining about poorly written quiz questions together made it more fun. I brought the current book I was reading with me everywhere and sometimes had  my wife read the text aloud to me when we had a few extra minutes (like waiting at the doctor’s office). I’m happy to report that I didn’t study at all in the hospital when my daughter was born.

What’s the APICS CSCP Test Like?

Save the Date

The test itself is straightforward. It’s given in the same facility as GMAT and other standardized tests. Since the CSCP exam isn’t a wildly popular test, scheduling is often quite limited in some locations. I scheduled my test about two months in advance. This was good because the deadline motivated me to push through the texts. My friend didn’t schedule the test for some time and ended up dragging out her study period to eight months. If this might be a possibility, I recommend reserving early in your study process.

Test Day

My advice is to just stay cool on test day. Honestly, if you’ve read all the text, know the flashcards, and have received an 80% on the post-test, then you’ll pass. Don’t overthink the questions – there weren’t any trick questions that I remember. Eat a good breakfast, go to the testing center, and take care of business. You’ll do just fine.

Still have questions? Check out my article on Frequently Asked Questions about the APICS CSCP Exam to find more information about the exam process.

Build an Awesome Vendor Scorecard Program in 4 Easy Steps

Vendor scorecards measure and track supplier performance on various dimensions that are important to your organization. At first, I was reluctant to start a scorecard program because I thought our company was too small and too busy. However, after eventually beginning our program, I saw powerful results that freed up time and helped the company grow.

Vendor Scorecard Example

Vendor Scorecard Template with ExamplesVendor scorecards strengthen supply chain relationships and help focus your suppliers on what matters most to you. Scorecards set goals for your vendors to reach for so they can become your vendor of choice. You can clearly see where each vendor ranks against each other, which helps you decide which supplier to work with on complex projects. This article outlines the four steps I took in building our company’s vendor scorecard program. I have attached a Excel Vendor Scorecard Template that I put together as a starting place for your own scorecard.

1. Decide What Matters

The first step in creating a vendor scorecard program is to define what your ideal vendor would look like. For me, it would be someone that communicated clearly 100% of the time, shipped quality products for free, and had a lead time of 15 minutes. Although those requests are a bit ridiculous in my industry, it does highlight what matters to me in my vendors: communication, quality, pricing, and lead-time. Together with my team, we took my brainstorm farther and came up with four categories that matter most to us with our vendors:

  • Pricing/costs, including payment terms
  • Production and Supply chain, including communication and lead-time
  • Quality
  • Product Development

Essentially, if our vendors could continually improve on these four points each year, our organization would benefit immensely.

2. Measure the Metrics

Having defined the broad categories, we now have to build the nitty-gritty of the scorecard. You need to build specific, measurable metrics for each category. Specifically, what exactly will you measure, and more importantly, how? For example, a pricing metric could be a comparison of costs between all capable vendors. A quality metric might be the percentage of orders with quality defects.

Good scorecard metrics should clearly define what is good, acceptable, and bad performance in each dimension. Your metrics should be a score for how your vendors are doing in aspects that matter most to you. They should be easy to understand, and if possible, easy to calculate. Unfortunately, building the perfect metrics often takes some deep thought to get them right.

Nailing the Details is Key

Many metrics were much more complicated to fully define than I thought they would be. For example, lead time is an excellent metric that I use. Tracking the time from when you place an order to when it gets delivered is a great way to compare vendors and encourage reductions in lead time. However, measuring this can be tricky when you get into the details. Should you track the time until delivery at to your location or delivery at port? If you ask a vendor to delay a shipment, will their lead-time artificially inflate?

For most quantitative metrics, your accounting system should have the records you need. However, based on the specific things you want to measure  you also might need to start tracking new events or information. For both of the above lead-time questions, I had to change our receipt processes to account for how we wanted to measure that metric. Despite the added work, tracking more data allowed us to trust our metrics and better compare our vendors apples to apples.

A Note on Subjective Scores

When hard data is unavailable or impossible, use a subjective grade. For example, “This Vendor is Flexible in Requests to Alter Production” is a difficult metric to track in our ERP system. Instead, at the end of each quarter, our supply chain team fills out a survey for each vendor that rates them on several dimensions such as flexibility. Rating vendors on a scale is the best way to get a good score from a soft metric. Even better is when the survey has an example for a top, middle, and bottom score for the metric so that scoring is more consistent across teammates. Recording everything in a free Google Form that you send out to your team is even better.

Google Doc Questionnaire 2

Weight What Matters

Once you have the metrics you want to measure (I have 4-6 in each category), it’s time to weight them. Start by rating the overall categories. The pricing category may be 25% of the total score, quality 40%. When your categories equal 100%, weight the individual components of each category. For example, if the quality category is weighted at 20% and has three metrics, then those three metrics could be 5%, 12%, and 3%, which adds up to 20%. The Vendor Scorecard Template shows my weighting.

Example Weighting

Pull Out the Gradebook

Maybe it’s from the report cards I received every semester in public school, but the A through F scale carries a lot of significance to me. That’s why I like to use that scale for each of my metrics. Some can only receive an A or F, or A, C, or F, but they all have the same percentage score. Based on their grade, vendors receive a percentage of that metrics weight as follows:

  • A – 100% A metric with 10% of the total scorecard weight would be 10% with an A
  • B – 75% (7.5% with the same metric)
  • C – 50% (5%)
  • D – 25% (2.5%)
  • F – 0%

Color-coding the scale adds the final touch of understanding so that it translates well and conveys the message clearly.

Example Weighting

Build the Document

Finally, once you’ve figured out your categories, metrics, and weighting, put it all together in a spreadsheet scorecard. You can use my template as a starting point to build your own.

3. Roll Out the Program

Once your scorecard is complete, implementation is your next bull to lasso. You’ll need to devise a plan to clearly communicate what, why, and how you are measuring your vendors. Depending on your suppliers, your experience could be much different, but here’s what I did.Why a Vendor Scroecard?

First, I put together a presentation with one or more slides explaining the following. It was detailed and thorough so that our vendors could clearly understand each score. Specifically, the document had the following:

  • A detailed explanation of each category and metric
    • For complex calculations, I included an example slide
    • Explanation of weights were also included
  • Reasons why we were beginning the vendor scorecard program
  • The implementation schedule (trial and full launch)
  • Our commitment to our vendors

Armed with a document that clearly defined the program, our CEO emailed the presentation and the scorecard spreadsheet to the leadership of our key suppliers. He asked them to review it and then meet with us in a video conference discussing the program. During the meetings with our six key suppliers, the CEO expressed support of the program and our supply chain team explained the details. Most vendors appreciate being measured on more than just price, and so all of our vendors were excited about the program as a chance to prove their holistic value to our company.

We designated the first month as a trial period where we would track performance, iron out issues, and report scores but not take action based on their results. After meeting at the end of the first month to discuss the trial run, we began the program in earnest.

4. Review and Reward

What will make your vendor scorecard program truly succeed is your diligence after implementation. I strive to send out scorecards on-time at the end of every quarter. My team schedules meetings via Skype or in person to review the scorecard each quarter and discuss ways to improve. The communication is two-way – we want all our vendors to reach perfect scores. That is why we council openly about what each of us can change to improve the metrics.

Another big decision to make is what you’ll do because of the scores. Will vendors with consistently high scores obtain a preferred status? Will quality checks or audits happen less frequently? Will you distance yourself from vendors who are very cheap, but fail in every other category? Will you reward contracts based on scores?

If you find yourself rewarding higher scores with more business, then your weighting is probably correct. However, if more and more business is still going to vendors with lower scores, then consider revising your scorecard to better reflect your company’s true priorities.

A great and relatively inexpensive way to encourage scorecard improvement is a vendor of the year program. This could involve a personal meeting, dinner with the CEO, and a plaque for the winning company. When I watch the “Walmart Vendor of the Year” award go to one of my competitors, I find new motivation to improve. Your suppliers may feel the same.

Bonus Step – Survey Your Vendors for Improvement Tips

If your vendor scorecard program is chugging along, then consider asking your vendors to score you. Sending a quarterly feedback survey to your vendors to discuss at the same time as their scorecard can bring insights into how you can be a better customer. Some questions could be:

  • What good practices do your other customers do that you wish we did?
  • What can we do to help you reduce lead-time?
  • What was an example of a project that went well? What about that experience can we recreate for all future projects?

If you make it clear they won’t be penalized for honesty, then you may be lucky enough to get great feedback on how to truly improve. Becoming a better customer can help your vendors better service you. In addition, you may pick up some best practices from their other customers or resolve root causes of your own deep problems. Address these issues in the scorecard review meetings and make commitments to improve when possible. We received a lot best practice tips from our vendors when we said, “we’re really bad at forecasting, so we’ve brought on staff with forecasting experience and invested in the software we needed.” They detailed how their other customers forecast and recommended we try the same.

Final Thoughts

As I talked about in my article on supply chain gamification, games have a way of bringing out our passion and motivation. A vendor scorecard brings the power of game mentality to supplier relations. “Just keep everything green and keep out reds” becomes the goal of your vendors. “Work with the highest scoring vendors” becomes your vendor selection shortcut. Measuring progress brings improvement that both your vendor and you will enjoy.

From the success I’ve seen from the program, I wish I had started it years ago. This quickly brought to mind the mantra of a friend of mine in process improvement. “There’s two good times to plant a tree: twenty years ago and now.”

If you haven’t started a program yet, begin today. If you have one already, take a look at how you can improve. Either way, share your experience in a comment below.

Update – Learn More about Vendor Scorecards in our Podcast

In our podcast interview with Mark Kosiba (former VP of Operations at Skullcandy), Mark talks about vendor scorecards and their effect on his company. The above model was based on his help, so it definitely applies to anyone wanting to implement a vendor scorecard program similar to the above.

Check out the podcast to learn more: How Skullcandy Rocked S&OP (and Vendor Scorecards)

“He Ships, He Scores!” Improving Your Supply Chain with Games

Mario Fork Lift
Friday evening had arrived, and I was very excited to be on my way home. My wife and I were going on our first date in over four months – the first time we would leave our new daughter with family as we had some fun. After dinner, we went to one of my all-time favorite places: The Nicklecade. The Nicklecade is an arcade full of older games that each only cost $0.05 to play. Ten dollars can keep two people playing the gaming classics all evening. As we played Ski-ball, Dance Dance Revolution, San Francisco Rush racing, and even Guitar Hero, I was struck by how motivated I was on a Friday night.

I had just spent an entire week in typing emails at a computer and occasionally helping with repetitive physical tasks in the warehouse. Now, on a Friday night, I was in front of computers again pressing buttons and tossing ski-balls up the ramp over and over to try and beat my wife’s high score (which I was unable to top). How could the similar skills and activities be so fun and motivating as I worked for tickets, and less so as I worked for paychecks?

The Game of Work

My question caused me to recall a business book classic called The Game of Work by Charles Coonradt. Written in 1984, before a generation was raised on videogame achievements and scores, Coonradt was struck by a similar question to mine regarding construction workers. They would slowly plod along building a house, but during lunch time, they’d run to a local basketball court and give everything they had to obtain 4-on-4 lunchtime victory. Realizing that the principals of games could increase motivation and productivity in the workplace, Coonradt defined five rules of gamification – harnessing the power of game thinking in traditionally non-game work.

  1. Clearly defined goals – Put the basketball through the basket
  2. Better scorekeeping and scorecards – The score is 87 to 89, our team is down by two with a minute left in the game.
  3. More frequent feedback – The scoreboard tells you immediately if you made a goal, and a referee’s whistle will sound every time you break a rule
  4. A higher degree of personal choice of methods – Score points; it doesn’t matter if they are lay-ups, dunks, field goals, or 3-pointers
  5. Consistent coaching – whenever I have a question, I can look over to my coach for guidance or call a time out for more detailed help

Supply chain and operation works lends itself directly to this type of job enhancement. Below are some examples of how gamification has helped boost productivity.

Charles Schwab Throws Out a Challenge

In Dale Carnegie’s book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, the story of Charles Schwab keeping score is a fun example of early gamification.

“Charles Schwab had a mill manager whose people weren’t producing their quota of work.

“How is it,” Schwab asked him, “that a manager as capable as you can’t make this mill turn out what it should?”

“I don’t know,” the manager replied. “I’ve coaxed the men, I’ve pushed them, I’ve sworn and cussed, I’ve threatened them with damnation and being fired. But nothing works. They just won’t produce.”

This conversation took place at the end of the day, just before the night shift came on. Schwab asked the manager for a piece of chalk, then, turning to the nearest man, asked: “How many heats did your shift make today?”

“Six.”

Without another word, Schwab chalked a big figure six on the floor, and walked away.

When the night shift came in, they saw the “6” and asked what it meant.

“The big boss was in here today,” the day people said. “He asked us how many heats we made, and we told him six. He chalked it down on the floor.”

The next morning Schwab walked through the mill again. The night shift had rubbed out “6” and replaced it with a big “7.”

When the day shift reported for work the next morning, they saw a big “7” chalked on the floor. So the night shift thought they were better than the day shift did they? Well, they would show the night shift a thing or two. The crew pitched in with enthusiasm, and when they quit that night, they left behind them an enormous, swaggering “10.” Things were stepping up.

Shortly this mill, which had been lagging way behind in production, was turning out more work than any other mill in the plant. The principle?

Let Charles Schwab say it in his own words: “The way to get things done,” says Schwab, “is to stimulate competition. I do not mean in a sordid, money-getting way, but in the desire to excel.”

Quoted from Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People

A Jewelry Manufacturer Keeps High Scores

A factory that made recognition jewelry created a very simple computer program in the 1980s. The employee would log in his or her manufacturing job, say polishing 100 medallions, and the computer would time him. After the employee completed the work, he or she would see how quickly he or she had accomplished the work. The computer then ranked him or her against personal past records as well as everyone else. The program let the employee know whether the score was above or below average – and by how much. This simple program quickly increased efficiency of the entire factory as everyone tried to beat their coworker and their own records.

Real-time Shipping Dashboard Focused our Warehouse

A couple years ago, as our company quickly grew, we felt a need for better visibility to our warehouse operations. I had worked at Sonic in high school where little TV screens showed each order and helped me know how many hamburgers to make. Could we make a dashboard that showed us what orders we had to ship? With some VBA coding, I was able to create a real-time shipping dashboard that did just that. Every ten minutes, the computer would automatically update from our system database and show the orders we needed to ship and had shipped already that day. If an order went late, it would show up in red. As long as everything was green on the dashboard, we knew we were shipping on time and winning for the company. The dashboard was so effective that I was able to completely step away from warehouse operations as the team worked together to keep the dashboard green – or score points –rather than a manager directing every step.

Ideas for Gamifying Your Supply Chain

Having a better grasp of the principals of gamification, how can you better apply them in your supply chain? Here are some ideas:

  • Vendor Scorecards – We’ve been working extensively on a comprehensive vendor-scoring program. We are giving quarterly feedback on how key vendors are doing on dimensions important to our success. We also hope to build a “Vendor of the Year” award to reward good scores. Without the scorecard, however, our vendors can’t be confident in how they can better serve us as their customer.Crosstraining
  • Cross-training Achievements – An easy way to turn long-term training into a game is to create a grid of people and processes. As employees learn new processes, they receive a sticker that becomes a badge of cross-training achievement. Fast-food restaurants do this all the time. When we put this together in our warehouse, I was amazed by how quickly people began asking their supervisor to train them on new skills so that they could mark it off on the grid.
  • Pick-to-voice Warehouse Picking Systems – Wearing a headset that tells you where to pick your next order is a popular technology in large warehouses. These pick-to-voice systems often track efficiency and set goals for each picker. Taking that technology a step further, you could keep score on a large screen or let pickers “level up.” As employees reach certain scores, they could be rewarded with more difficult orders to pick – or move into new zones of the warehouse. Even adding the “1UP” sound from Super Mario and other video game trademarks could make order picking more engaging.
  • Pallet Wrapping Competition – If you have 30 pallets to wrap by hand, divide everyone into three teams and see who can wrap 10 in the shortest amount of time. Whenever students from local colleges tour our company, I ask them to compete in a “warehouse Olympics” game to see how they fare with the most basic of supply chain tasks. I quite enjoy watching college students race, and often struggle, to tape boxes, sort returns, and wrap pallets.
  • Vendor Terms Competition – Our CEO created a list of vendors that he wanted a dozen employees to contact and ask for extended payment terms. Each Vendor had an employee assigned to it. The list was in a Google spreadsheet we all shared, which allowed us to see each other’s progress in real-time. We could approach the request any way we wanted, and we even received a small gift card when we achieved our goal.
  • Real-time Dashboards and Metrics – Building on our shipping dashboard, we now have a large handful of other real-time dashboards. Purchase Orders, Accounts Receivable, and Accounts Payable are just a few examples of how we keep score. Our jobs become a game of keeping the dashboards free of red lines, which helps us focus on activities that help the company.

Supply chain is the ideal place to apply gamification principals. Large amounts of real-time data make keeping score much more achievable than in other less data-driven disciplines.

Whether it’s PlayStation 4, the NFL, or Monopoly, everyone on my team has a passion for games. Tweaking processes to channel that passion has helped my company in powerful ways. Applying Coonradt’s five “Game of Work” principals helps everyone better achieve results that help the company and enjoy their work more. Most importantly, that increase in motivation helps us become a stronger company and a more competitive supply chain.

Now instead of getting back to work, get back to gaming.

— —

If you’d like to learn more, please check out the below sites that were a source for parts of this article.